Katie Martinez

About Katie Martinez

Within three years of his diagnosis with aggressive prostate cancer, Richard (Dick) Treat lost his battle at the age of 66—leaving behind a wife, two sons, two daughters and five grandsons. Dick’s story is not uncommon. In fact, in 2012, more than 28,000 other men will lose their life and time with family to prostate cancer. Though common, no man who loses his life is ever forgotten, nor does he leave families, friends and communities untouched or unchanged. Dick Treat’s legacy now continues through his family and community.

Dick’s diagnosis came at a pivotal time for his family—his oldest daughter was just married, his sons were expanding their families with children and his youngest, Katie, had just graduated college. These important milestones in his children’s lives led Dick and his wife to keep the severity of his disease quiet until they heard the same results from multiple doctors. These results were devastating—the disease had metastasized to his liver, kidney, ribs, spine and lymph nodes—and later to his brain.

“After all four diagnoses came back with the same results, my dad sat us down as a family and shared that all four doctors had given him the same diagnosis: two to five years maximum to live,” shares Katie. “That is when it really hit home for our entire family and our lives changed. Our dad was the glue and the life of the party for our family.”

“Dollars raised for PCF will help affect future generations. I was lucky for the time I had with my dad, but every girl deserves a father/daughter dance on their wedding day and share in special moments.”

For the next two years, the Treat family spent quality time together, taking family vacations to some of Dick’s favorite destinations and enjoying life with one another. “As awful as it was, he remained so positive—he didn’t want to let anyone worry about him,” adds Katie.

Until two months before his passing, Dick remained an active member in five senior softball leagues, which he had been part of for years. In fact, this is where Dick was first flagged that he may have a health problem related to his prostate. At the Huntsman World Games, a trailer was stationed for men to have a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test. This important screening tool available to men who may not have otherwise been routinely tested got Katie thinking. What could she do to help educate men and raise awareness for a disease that affects 1 in 7 U.S. men?

Though not an avid runner, Katie ran one marathon shortly after college and played soccer her entire life. Her dad was always at her practices and games, rain or shine. After looking into running events that benefit prostate cancer, she came across Athletes for a Cure (AFAC), the fundraising and awareness program of the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), who was the official beneficiary organization of the Denver Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon & ½. “I knew I had to do this marathon with AFAC and PCF, it meant the world to me.”

26.2 miles and $5,000 later, Katie and Laurie completed the full marathon together, honoring Richard every step of the way. Today, Katie is preparing for her newest venture with Athletes for a Cure—the Muddy Buddy Adventure Series, benefiting Athletes for a Cure. With two locations already secured, Katie has begun her fundraising efforts, hoping to surpass dollars raised from the Denver marathon.

“The funds I raise for PCF will help affect future generations. I was lucky for the time I had with my dad, but every girl deserves a father/daughter dance on their wedding day and share in special moments.”

Katie is also the aunt to five boys—a role she takes very seriously—and will be running one Muddy Buddy event with her oldest nephew, who is 13. Dollars raised through the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Athletes for a Cure will no doubt have an impact on these boys’ lives. “I know the money raised today has the potential to save their life.”

Katie will be traveling from Northern California to Denver, Colorado for the event on September 22, 2012—with her family and best friend, Laurie, by her side. She will be wearing blue for her dad, the official awareness color of prostate cancer, but believes most important is her fundraising efforts. To-date, Katie has raised nearly $5,000 for the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

“Dollars raised for PCF will help affect future generations. I was lucky for the time I had with my dad, but every girl deserves a father/daughter dance on their wedding day and share in special moments.”

Katie is also the aunt to five boys—a role she takes very seriously. Dollars raised through the Prostate Cancer Foundation and Athletes for a Cure will no doubt have an impact on these boys’ lives. “I know the money raised today has the potential to save their life.” She is passionate about spreading more awareness and recognizes that prostate cancer does not receive as much attention as other prominent cancers. With supporters like Katie, more men could make educated and informed decisions about their prostate health.

As Katie shares on her fundraising page, “my dad’s legacy is that he didn’t need a diagnosis to prioritize what mattered in life. Dick was all about family and friends and anyone who knew him can attest to how amazing he was at making time for those he loved. On February 6, 2011 my dad told my mom he loved her one last time and took his final breath while she held him.”

Support Katie’s efforts at the Muddy Buddy Adventure Series atwww.athletesforacure.org/.

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