1. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in men in the U.S., and the 4th most common tumor diagnosed worldwide.

2. In the United States, 1 in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime. For men of African descent, 1 in 7 will develop the disease.

3. African American men are 79% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men, and are more than twice as likely to die from the disease.

4. In 2020, nearly 192,000 U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and more than 33,000 will die from the disease. That’s one new case diagnosed every 3 minutes and another death from prostate cancer every 16 minutes.

5. A man is more likely to develop prostate cancer than he is to develop colon, kidney, melanoma, and stomach cancers combined.

6. It is estimated that more than 3 million U.S. men are living with prostate cancer.

7. As men increase in age, their risk of developing prostate cancer increases exponentially. About 6 in 10 cases are found in men over the age of 65.

8. Men with relatives — father, brother, son — with a history of prostate cancer may be twice as likely to develop the disease.

9. Prostate cancer can be silent — it’s important to get checked, even if you have no symptoms.

10. 99% of patients with local or regional disease live 5 years or longer after diagnosis.

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1. Eat fewer calories and exercise more so that you maintain a healthy weight.

2. Try to keep the amount of fat you get from red meat and dairy products to a minimum.

3. Watch your calcium intake. Do not take supplemental doses far above the recommended daily allowance. Some calcium is OK, but avoid taking more than 1,200 mg per day.

4. Eat more fish – evidence from several studies suggest that fish can help protect against prostate cancer because they have “good fat,” particularly omega-3 fatty acids. Avoid trans fatty acids (for example, in margarine).

5. Incorporate cooked tomatoes (prepared with olive oil), which may be beneficial, and cruciferous vegetables (like broccoli and cauliflower) into many of your weekly meals. Soy-based foods and green tea are also potential dietary components that may be helpful.

6. Avoid smoking for many reasons. Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all.

7. Seek medical treatment for stress, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, and depression. Treating these conditions may save your life and will improve your survivorship with prostate cancer.

8. Avoid over-supplementation with megavitamins. While a multivitamin is not likely to be harmful, you probably don’t need it if you follow a healthy diet with lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils. Ask your doctor about herbal supplements as some may harm you or interfere with treatment.

9. Relax and enjoy life. Reducing stress in the workplace and home will improve your survivorship and lead to a longer, happier life.

10. For men 45 or older (40 or older for African American men or those with a family history of prostate cancer), discuss the risks and benefits of screening with a PSA test and, if indicated, a rectal examination, with your doctor.

Download a PDF version of this list here
  • Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America, affecting 1 in 9 men.
  • In 2020, nearly 192,000 U.S. men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and more than 33,000 will die from the disease. That’s one new case diagnosed every 3 minutes and another death from prostate cancer every 16 minutes.
  • It is estimated that more than 3 million U.S. men are living with prostate cancer.
  • A man is more likely to develop prostate cancer than he is to develop colon, kidney, melanoma, and stomach cancers combined.
  • The chance of being diagnosed with prostate cancer increases rapidly after age 50. About 6 in 10 of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65.
  • Men of African-American descent are 79% more likely to develop Prostate Cancer and 2.2 times more likely to die from it.  You can read more about prostate cancer in African-American men here.
  • Prostate cancer is among the most heritable of the major human cancers; It is estimated that more than half (57%) of prostate cancer risk is due to genetic factors.

As with all cancers, “cure” rates for prostate cancer describe the percentage of patients likely remaining disease-free for a specific time. In general, the earlier the cancer is caught, the more likely it is for the patient to remain disease-free.

Because approximately 90% of all prostate cancers are detected in the local and regional stages, the cure rate for prostate cancer is very high—nearly 100% of men diagnosed at this stage will be disease-free after five years. By contrast, in the 1970s, only 67% of men diagnosed with local or regional prostate cancer were disease-free after five years.

What are the symptoms of prostate cancer?

If the cancer is caught at its earliest stages, most men will not experience any symptoms. Some men, however, will experience symptoms such as frequent, hesitant, or burning urination, difficulty in having an erection, or pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips or upper thighs.

Because these symptoms can also indicate the presence of other diseases or disorders, men who experience any of these symptoms will undergo a thorough work-up to determine the underlying cause of the symptoms. You can read more about prostate cancer symptoms here.

 

If there are no symptoms, how is prostate cancer detected?

Screening for prostate cancer can be performed in a physician’s office using two tests: the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test and the digital rectal exam (DRE).

 

There are a wide variety of treatment options available for men with prostate cancer, including surgery, radiation therapy, hormone therapy and chemotherapy, any or all of which might be used at different times depending on the stage of disease and the need for treatment.

Consultation with all three types of prostate cancer specialists—a urologist, a radiation oncologist and a medical oncologist—will offer the most comprehensive assessment of the available treatments and expected outcomes. For men with advanced disease or an increased risk due to family history or lifestyle, precision treatments based on genetic screening may be recommended.

More information regarding treatments for prostate cancer can be found on our website here.

 

Additional information about prostate cancer can be found through our Understanding Prostate Cancer section, our guides and the Treatment Options section of our website. You can order a paper copy or download our guides in pdf format here.

The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is the world’s leading philanthropic organization dedicated to funding life-saving prostate cancer research. Founded in 1993 by Mike Milken, PCF has raised more than $800 million in support of cutting-edge research by more than 2,200 research projects at 220 leading cancer centers in 22 countries around the world. Thanks in part to PCF’s commitment to ending death and suffering from prostate cancer, the death rate is down more than 50% and countless more men are alive today as a result. PCF research now impacts more than 70 forms of human cancer by focusing on immunotherapy, the microbiome, and food as medicine.

The Prostate Cancer Foundation has accomplished a great deal, but there is still much more to do. Please join us in this race to find a cure for prostate cancer and donate today.

There are many options for treatment at all stages of prostate cancer. If you are diagnosed with prostate cancer, make sure to get on the “right track”: that is, the right team, the right tests, and the right treatments, right from the start. Learn more at pcf.org/therighttrack.

Kraft Right Track